Voting Record

The Alliance for Retired Americans today released its 2015 voting record report which scored every U.S. Representative and Senator on key issues affecting current and future retirees. The voting record examined 10 key Senate votes and 10 key House votes in 2015, showing the roll calls on issues such as:

  • attacking our core retiree programs of Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid;
  • passing fast track trade authority, which extinguishes the ability to scrutinize and amend proposed trade agreements that would lock in higher drug prices; and
  • addressing income inequality by raising the minimum wage

“Unfortunately, the new Congress that came to town did not help improve the nation’s retirement security,” said Robert Roach, Jr., President of the Alliance. “We had an opportunity for change but we didn’t take advantage of it. Nine of 12 freshman Republican Senators scored zero, and the others scored 10%. This Voting Record reflects how committed our elected representatives are to seniors. It will be a useful tool as we look at who is truly our friend.”

You can download either the full report, or a state-by-state report, or search for your member by zip code below:

2015 House Votes

ExitICO

House Rules

The House passed its procedural rules which contained a provision that would not allow Congress to reallocate funds to the Social Security disability insurance trust fund unless changes were made to the program making it more difficult for workers to obtain disability benefits. The rule passed 234-172. A NO vote is the pro-retiree vote. H. Res. 5, Roll Call No. 6, January 6, 2015.

Health Care Repeal I

Representative Byrne, R-AL, introduced a bill that would repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Repeal would negatively impact America’s seniors by revoking significant drug discounts for Medicare beneficiaries who fall into the Part D doughnut hole; revoking free wellness and preventive screenings; and revoking Medicaid options that allow older Americans with chronic conditions to live at home rather than in institutions. The bill passed 239-186. A NO vote is the pro-retiree vote. H.R. 596, Roll Call No. 58, February 3, 2015.

Pro-Retiree Budget

Representative Van Hollen, D-MD, offered a substitute to the House budget resolution that protects Medicare and Medicaid, reallocates funding for the Social Security dis-ability insurance program. The amendment failed 160-264. A YES vote is the pro-retiree vote. H. Con. Res. 27, Roll Call No. 139, March 25, 2015.

House Budget Resolution

Representative Price, R-GA, introduced the Fiscal Year 2016 Budget Resolution that makes $5.5 trillion in cuts to many domestic programs important to seniors. It also turns Medicare into a voucher program, severely cuts Medicaid, and repeals the Affordable Care Act. The resolution passed 228-199. A NO vote is the pro-retiree vote. H. Con. Res. 27, Roll Call No.142, March 25, 2015.

Estate Tax Repeal

The House passed a bill introduced by Representative Brady, R-TX, to repeal the federal estate tax. Repeal of the estate tax disproportionately benefits the wealthiest Americans. The loss of estate tax revenues further skews income inequality and adds to the national debt. The legislation passed 240-179. A NO vote is the pro-retiree vote. H.R. 1105, Roll Call No. 161, April 16, 2015.

Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA)

The House voted to extend TAA, which provides aid for workers who have been adversely affected by trade deals by providing job training, economic assistance and health benefits assistance. However, the extension would be paid for by cutting $950 million from Medicare, which the Alliance opposes. The bill failed 126-302. A NO vote is the pro-retiree vote. H.R. 1314, Roll Call No. 361, June 12, 2015.

Trade Fast Track

This bill provides the President more authority to negotiate trade agreements. It also subjects Congress only to an up-or-down vote when considering the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and other trade agreements, without the possibility of amendments. The bill passed 218-208. A NO vote is the pro-retiree vote. H.R. 2146, Roll Call No. 374, June 18, 2015.

Health Care Repeal II

The House passed budget reconciliation legislation that repeals parts of the Affordable Care Act, including the individual and employer mandates and subsidies for individuals to purchase insurance. The repeal would result in 10 million people losing their health insurance. The bill passed 240-189. A NO vote is the pro-retiree vote. H.R. 3762, Roll Call No. 568, October 23, 2015.

Retirement Advice Repeal

Representative Wagner, R-MO, introduced legislation to delay implementation of the Department of Labor (DOL) fiduciary rule, which requires that financial advisers pro-vide advice that is in the best interest of their clients. DOL estimates that consumers lose $17 billion a year due to advice that is not in their best interest. The legislation passed 245-186. A NO vote is the pro-retiree vote. H.R. 1090, Roll Call No. 575, October 27, 2015.

2016 Spending Agreement

This agreement lifts sequester levels for two years, increasing funding for defense and non-defense discretionary spend-ing by $80 billion, and lifts the debt-ceiling until 2017. The bill also reallocates funding to the Social Security disability program until 2022. It reduces increases in Medicare Part B premiums for 16 million Medicare beneficiaries who would have been subjected to a 52% increase in 2016. The bill passed 266-167. A YES vote is the pro-retiree vote. H.R. 1314, Roll Call No. 579, October 28, 2015.

ExitICO

2015 Senate Votes

Stop Social Security Privatization

Senator Wyden, D-OR, offered an amendment to the Sen-ate budget resolution to create a point of order against legislation that would cut benefits, raise the retirement age, or privatize Social Security. The amendment needing 60 votes failed 51-48. A YES vote is the pro-retiree vote. S.Con.Res. 11, Roll Call No. 84, March 24, 2015.

Stop Medicare Privatization

Senator Bennet, D-CO, offered an amendment to the Sen-ate budget resolution to create a point of order against legislation that would privatize Medicare, cut guaranteed benefits, increase out-of-pocket spending, or turn Medicare into a premium support plan. The amendment failed 46-53. A YES vote is the pro-retiree vote. S.Con.Res. 11, Roll Call No. 90, March 24, 2015.

Reverse Sequestration Cuts

Senator Murray, D-WA, offered an amendment to the Sen-ate budget resolution to restore a below-sequester level cut of $9 billion to non-defense discretionary spending in 2017, replacing sequestration in 2016 and 2017 and increasing funding above sequester levels by a total of $148 billion for the 2 years, increasing defense and non-defense discretionary spending by equal amounts. The measure would be paid for by closing tax loopholes. The amendment failed 46-53. A YES vote is the pro-retiree vote. S.Con.Res. 11, Roll Call No. 91, March 25, 2015.

Stop Medicaid Cuts

Senator Wyden, D-OR, offered an amendment to the Sen-ate budget resolution that would strike more than $1.2 trillion in cuts to Medicaid, preserving a critical source of comprehensive, affordable health and long-term care coverage for millions of otherwise uninsured low-income adults, parents and seniors. The amendment failed 47-53. A YES vote is the pro-retiree vote. S.Con.Res. 11, Roll Call No. 95, March 26, 2015.

Stop Medicare Cuts

Senator Stabenow, D-MI, offered an amendment to the Senate budget resolution to reject the proposed $435 billion in cuts to Medicare. The amendment failed 46-54. A YES vote is the pro-retiree vote. S.Con.Res. 11, Roll Call No. 111, March 26, 2015.

Social Security Expansion

Senators Warren, D-MA, and Manchin, D-WV, introduced an amendment to the Senate budget resolution to expand Social Security. It requires that the Senate budget support the sustainable expansion of benefits, make the Social Security Trust Fund permanently solvent and accomplish these changes in a paid-for, deficit neutral way. The amendment failed 42-56. A YES vote is the pro-retiree vote. S.Con.Res. 11, Roll Call No. 131, March 27, 2015.

Anti-Retiree Budget

Senator Enzi, R-WY, introduced the Fiscal Year 2016 Budget Resolution. The budget transforms Medicaid into a block-grant system with $400 billion in additional cuts over 10 years and cuts $435 billion from Medicare. The budget also preserves sequester-level spending for all non-defense discretionary spending in addition to cutting spending further by $236 billion over the next decade and impacting programs important to older and lower income Americans. The resolution passed by 52-46. A NO vote is the pro-retiree vote. S. Con. Res 11, Roll Call No. 135, March 27, 2015.

Trade Fast Track

This bill provides the President more authority to negotiate trade agreements. It also subjects Congress to only an up-or-down vote when considering the Trans-Pacific Partner-ship (TPP) and other trade agreements, without the possibility of amendments. The bill passed 60-38. A NO vote is the pro-retiree vote. H.R. 2146, Roll Call No, 219. June 24, 2014.

2016 Spending Agreement

This agreement lifts sequester levels for two years, increasing funding for defense and non-defense discretionary spend-ing by $80 billion, and lifts the debt-ceiling until 2017. The bill also reallocates funding to the Social Security disabil-ity program until 2022. It reduces increases in Medicare Part B premiums for 16 million Medicare beneficiaries who would have been subjected to a 52% increase in 2016. The bill passed 64-35. A YES vote is the pro-retiree vote. H.R. 1314, Roll Call No. 294, October 30, 2015.

Health Care Repeal

The Senate passed a budget reconciliation bill that repeals parts of the Affordable Care Act, including the individual and employer mandates, subsidies for individuals to purchase insurance, and Medicaid expansion. The repeal would result in more than 10 million people losing their health insurance. The bill passed 52-47. A NO vote is the pro-retiree vote. H.R. 3762, Roll Call No. 329, December 3, 2015.


2014 Alliance for Retired Americans Voting Record

For our 2014 Congressional Voting Record the Alliance for Retired Americans examined 10 key Senate and 10 key House of Representative votes on issues that affect older Americans including privatizing Medicare, raising the minimum wage, keeping the government open and turning Medicaid into a block grant system.

In all, 135 U.S. House members achieved perfect scores of 100 percent while 122 received scores of zero. 49 members of the U.S. Senate achieved perfect scores of 100 percent in 2014, while 34 received a score of zero including Republican presidential candidates Ted Cruz (R-TX), Lindsey Graham (R-SC), Marco Rubio (R-FL), and Rand Paul (R-KY).

Read the full report for details on the votes as well as the lifetime voting record scores of the senators and representatives.

Read the Press Release

Download the Voting Record

2013 Alliance for Retired Americans Voting Record

Read the Press Release

Download the Voting Record

2012 Alliance for Retired Americans Voting Record

Read the Press Release

Download the Voting Record

2011 Alliance for Retired Americans Voting Record

Read the Press Release

Download the Voting Record

2010 Alliance for Retired Americans Voting Record

Read the Press Release

Download the Voting Record

2009 Alliance for Retired Americans Voting Record

Read the Press Release

Download the Voting Record

2008 Alliance for Retired Americans Voting Record

Read the Press Release

Download the Voting Record

2007 Alliance for Retired Americans Voting Record

Read the Press Release

Download the Voting Record

2006 Alliance for Retired Americans Voting Record

Read the Press Release

Download the Voting Record

2005 Alliance for Retired Americans Voting Record

Read the Press Release

Download the Voting Record