Fact Sheets

February 06, 2017

2017 Social Security and Medicare Factsheet

Social Security and Medicare Factsheet

The Many Faces of Social Security

  • Nearly 171 million workers contribute to Social Security through payroll taxes.
  • Nearly 61 million people receive monthly Social Security benefits:
    • 44.2 million receive retirement benefits
    • 6.0 million receive survivors’ benefits
    • 10.6 million receive disability benefits.

Average 2017 Monthly Social Security Benefit                       

  • A retired worker: $1,360
  • A retired couple: $2,260
  • Disabled worker: $1,171
  • Disabled worker with spouse and child: $1,996
  • Widow or widower: $1,300
  • Young widow or widower with two children: $2,695
  • Maximum Monthly Social Security Benefit: $2,687 (for worker retiring at Full Retirement Age).

Social Security Cost of Living Adjustment (COLA) for 2017: 0.3%

2017 Social Security & Medicare Contribution Amounts 

  • Social Security: 6.2% for both workers and employers.  This contribution is paid on earnings up to $127,200.
  • Medicare: 1.45% for both workers and employers on all wages.

2017 Social Security Eligibility: 

  • Full Retirement Age: 66
  • Early Retirement Age: 62  Taking early retirement can reduce Social Security benefits up to 30 percent.

Social Security:  When & How to Apply for Benefits

  • You should apply for Social Security benefits three months before the date you want your benefits to start.  You can apply in one of the following ways:
    • Visit your local Social Security office. Call 1-800-772-1213 to find the nearest office.
    • Call Social Security at 1-800-772-1213. If you are deaf or hard of hearing, you can call Social Security at TTY 1-800-325-0778.
    • Go Online: https://secure.ssa.gov/iClaim/rib

The Many Faces of Medicare

  • Nearly 171 million workers contribute to Medicare through payroll taxes.
  • Approximately 58.4 million people receive Medicare benefits, including:
    • 49.3 million individuals 65 and older
    • 9.1 million disabled individuals.

2017 Medicare Part A (Hospital Coverage)

  • Deductible: $1,316 (first 60 days of Medicare-covered inpatient hospital care)
  • Coinsurance: $0 (Days 1-60), $329 per day (Days 61-90)

2017 Medicare Part B (Physician Coverage)

Individual’s Income Couple’s Income Your 2017 Part B Monthly Premium
$85,000 or less $170,000 or less $109,00*
$85,001-$107.000 $170,001-$214,000 $187.50
$107,001-$160,000 $214,001-$320,000 $267.90
$160,001-$214,000 $320,001-$428,000 $348.30
Above $214,000 Above $428,000 $428.60
For All Beneficiaries: Part B Deductible is $183 and the Part B Copayment is 20%

*New beneficiaries and some public sector retirees in this income category will pay $134.    

2017 Medicare Part D (Prescription Drug Coverage) 

  • Monthly Premium: Varies by plan (higher-income consumers may pay more).
  • Deductible: Varies by plan, $400 maximum.
  • Doughnut Hole: $3,700 – varies. Beneficiaries in the doughnut hole will receive a 60% discount for brand named drugs and a 49% discount on generics.
  • Cap on Out-of-pocket Costs: $4,950 (prior to catastrophic, includes discounts)
  • In addition to a monthly plan premium, high-income individuals will pay an income-related monthly adjustment amount as noted below:
Individual’s Income Couple’s Income Income-related monthly adjustment amount
$85,000 or below $170,000 or below $0.00
$85,001 – $107,000 $170,001 – $214,000 $13.30
$107,001 – $160,000 $214,001 – $320,000 $34.20
$160,001 – $214,000 $320,001 – $428,000 $55.20
Above $214,000 Above $428,000 $76.20

Medicare:  When & How to Apply for Benefits

  • Generally, Medicare is available for people age 65 or older, younger people with disabilities and people with End Stage Renal Disease. If you are already receiving Social Security retirement benefits, you will be automatically enrolled in Medicare Parts A and B.  If you want to apply for Medicare, call (1-800-772-1213) or visit their website:  http://www.socialsecurity.gov/medicareonly.          01/6/17
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Topics: Affordable Care Act
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2 Comments

2 thoughts on “2017 Social Security and Medicare Factsheet”

  1. Do you need to be receiving Social Security to receive Medicare? For example can you apply to receive Medicare at age 65 and wait until age 66 to start receiving Social Security?

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